Some Convenient Steps For Recovering Data

The prevailing era is of technological advancements at a regular interval in each and every field. Business firms use these in their own favour to reduce time and effort. Security of information is one of the most essential part for carrying a business forward. The whole business depends on the data it has or will be provided to it. Many factors like hacking, coding, encryption, lack of privacy, etc. can result in a loss of data and that can result in hindrances that may be very difficult to recover from. There are a lot of data recovery software that are available at very low effort and time. One of the free data recovery software that is available on the internet is EaseUs Data Recovery. A program that is very user-friendly and is successful in presenting results in a total of just 3 steps. There is no need to go into technicality and can be done by anyone.

The Procedure For Data Recovery

The whole process includes three steps for data recovery that is provided by this data recovery software. Data can be recovered from different devices like personal computers, cameras, mobile phones, and data storage devices like USB, SD cards, hard disks etc. the three steps are –

  1. Install and launch of the software

To install the softwares in the desired devices is the first step and at the time of data loss this itself shouldn’t be the one that is lost form the device. After installation and completing the setup of the software, a location is required to be selected by the user, where the program would try to find the lost data. Any document, folder, file etc. can be chosen as the location to be searched. The location can also be any external storage device. All the locations will be searched for by the software and make a list of all the data that has been lost with a partition.

  1. The full device scan

The second step to recover data is scanning the device. the full device will be scanned by the software. The occurrence of recovery will then take place with a status of the same on the screen with the estimated remaining time to do so.  The scan that takes place is of two kinds. The quick scan is the first kind that carries on the Recycle Bin recovery in which the files that have been deleted from the recycle bin are recovered. The second kind of scanning is the deep scan that is done after the quick scan which scans all the locations carefully as a result of which it usually takes a longer time as compared to the quick scan. This scan should not be stopped or interrupted in any case.

  1. The recovery

The results of scan are then listed on the screen in three parts. The directory tree list is shown on the left most partition. The center of the partition displays the details of all the files and folders that is the size, date and time. And the rightmost partition shows the information of the files selected form the center. The recover option is selected after selecting and previewing the files to be recovered.

 

 

8 Great Stealth Games You Can Play on PC

If you like sneaking around the world, creeping up behind people and knocking them out (or taking their life), we’ve got some games for you to check out. These eight PC games let you indulge your inner thief, without all the pesky run-ins with law enforcement.

styx-master-of-shadows

Styx: Master of Shadows

Styx is a goblin thief who can use nooks, crannies, and shadows to conceal himself until the time is right to strike. You’d better bring your “A” stealth game as well, as the combat is a bit of an afterthought, and being forced to resort to it often leads to your demise. Luckily, the world is well-designed, with plenty of options for concealment and vertical movement. You can also check out the sequel, [i]Styx: Shards of Darkness[/a].

New Cinematic Trailer for Fan-Made Halo PC Game

 

The world of video game fan projects never ceases to amaze, as gamers everywhere continue to show-off their creativity and imagination by developing the kind of experiences that many of us wish would get an official release.

The latest in this long line of “I can’t believe someone is doing that” projects is called Installation 01, and it intends to give PC players everywhere a proper modern-day Halo multiplayer experience to call their own. You can check out this project’s progress in the developer diary video below:

Installation 01 is currently being developed by a group of 30 fans with various talents that intend for their game to be a largely unique experience in the style of previous Halo titles rather than a direct port of those games.

As part of their compliance with the content usage rules set forth by Microsoft, the Installation 01 team is developing nearly everything in the game (including assets that were previously included in Halo games) from scratch. That means that every character, every animation, every level, and every weapon has been hand-designed by the team. While much of the game is still made to resemble elements of the Halo franchise, the developers are also working on unique levels and weapons that will be exclusive to this release.

By going to such lengths to create everything themselves, the hope is that Microsoft will not shut down the game such as how Nintendo has shut down a few recent fan projects based on their properties. Given the sheer amount of work that appears to have gone into the project (it’s even set to feature its own level creation toolset), it certainly would be disappointing if this was ruled to be a license violation, especially since there have been no talks of porting the Halo franchise to PC since the release of Halo 2 for Windows in 2007.

The group behind this project have made some incredible progress since we last checked in. It’s clear that there’s still a ways to go before its completed, but the Installation 01 developers certainly prove their resolve in this Q&A video about the project:

If that’s not enough to convince you that the team behind this project is dedicated to bringing a complete Halo experience to PC users everywhere, then perhaps this impressive homemade cinematic trailer for Installation 01 may just get the job done with its look at how visceral classic Halobattles can get.

NFS 2017 to Feature Offline Single-Player, EA’s Ghost Games Reveals

EA-owned Ghost Games has confirmed that a new Need for Speed game will release later this year, with the return of a feature whose omission had infuriated many: the option to play offline.

“You will be able to play through a single player experience completely offline,” the developers said in an official blog post. “Before you ask, and we know you will, this does mean you will be able to pause the game.”

In two previous entries, Need for Speed had become an always-online experience, in a bid to merge the single-player and multiplayer experience. It seems EA is willing to backtrack on that mission, though there’s every chance that you will lose out on some single-player features while you’re offline. We won’t know for sure until EA Play, the company’s E3 off-shoot, rolls around in June.

On the face of it, it’s still a nice acceptance by the studio, after delivering two NFS titles – 2013’s Rivals, and 2015’s eponymous reboot – that essentially held you hostage.
Alongside, Ghost Games also revealed a few other details of their new racing game. For starters, the new NFS will be playable in daylight, as opposed to the 2015 instalment that took place entirely at night/dawn.NFS 2017 to Feature Offline Single-Player, EA's Ghost Games Reveals

Secondly, car customisation will stick around after making a return. “It’s not going away and it will play as strong a role as ever as we move forward into the next game and beyond,” it added.

In addition to that, it will stick with its open-world policy: “Whether you’re checking out your freshly customised ride or smoking the competition in an event up in the canyons, you’re going to want a world that not only looks beautiful, but offers you the space in which to do the things you want.”

And lastly, dirt racing also looks to be a part of NFS 2017. “We’re dialling up the action and allowing you to tear up the tarmac, and dirt, to your heart’s content,” Ghost Games said.

 

Here’s When You Can Play the Arms Global Testpunch for the Nintendo Switch

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Arms Global Testpunch demo begins this weekend
  • It is a 1.4GB download for the Nintendo Switch
  • It is only available in one hour timeslots

Much like Splatoon 2’s Global Testfire for the Nintendo Switch, Arms is having its own demo with the Arms Global Testpunch. The full game is out on June 16 and in the run up to that, you check out its multiplayer.

ALSO SEEArms for Nintendo Switch: Everything You Need to Know

Arms Global Testpunch for Nintendo Switch timings

    • May 26 – 5pm PT (May 27 – 5:30am IST)
    • May 27 – 5am, 11am, 5pm PT (May 27 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST, May 28 – 5pm IST)
    • May 28 – 5am, 11am PT (May 28 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST)
    • June 2 – 5pm PT (June 3 – 5:30am IST)
    • June 3 – 5am, 11am, 5pm PT (June 3 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST, June 4 5:30am IST)
    • June 4 – 5am, 11am PT (June 5 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST)
 Here's When You Can Play the Arms Global Testpunch for the Nintendo Switch

How long does Arms Global Testpunch session last?

Like Splatoon 2, Nintendo has confirmed that each session will last for an hour a piece. With the game out in a few weeks this is the best way to get a taste of what to expect to make up your mind.

It’s surprising that there will be only twelve hours of playable time in total — a far cry from weekend long play sessions we’ve seen from other publishers like Ubisoft with Rainbow Six Siege and Ghost Recon Wildlands. Perhaps Nintendo isn’t as confident about the Switch’s online capabilities as it would like us to believe? After Splatoon 2’s resoundingly positive demo we don’t think so.

The Arms Global Testpunch is a 1.4GB download and you can get it via the Nintendo eShop.

We discussed Arms on our weekly gaming podcast Transition. You can subscribe to it via Apple Podcasts orRSS or just listen to this episode by hitting the play button below.

Destiny 2: The 5 key things PC gamers need to know

 

It seems like only yesterday, or just over seven weeks ago, that we found out Destiny 2 would be coming to PC, shedding the original’s console-only shackles. On Thursday, Bungie revealed more details about the upcoming multi-player first-person shooter. A lot of it’s good, some of it’s not so good, and some of it’s downright surprising.

Here’s what PC gamers need to know about Destiny 2.

Destiny 2 will be a Battle.net exclusive

Say what? Yep. The PC edition will be available from Activision Blizzard-owned Battle.net, not Steam.

Bungie signed a 10-year publishing deal with Activision so it makes a little sense to see Destiny 2 on Battle.net, but it’s still surprising. Until now the site was exclusively for Blizzard’s own games, with other Activision games such as Call of Duty appearing on platforms like Steam and the Windows Store.

Does Destiny 2‘s arrival on Battle.net herald the beginning of another rival to Steam or an Activision-wide version of EA’s Origin? Not according to Blizzard. The company says this is all about getting Destiny 2 out to the world as quickly as possible. Bungie can focus on making a great game (and spinning up game servers), while Blizzard takes care of the social and retail aspects. Sounds reasonable, but it’ll be interesting to see if any more non-Blizzard games show up on Battle.net over the next year or so.

Lots of PC-friendly features

This doesn’t sound like a half-assed port, as Bungie’s plans include a lot of PC-centric features, according to PC Gamer. That includes full keyboard and mouse support, custom keymapping, 4K and ultrawide resolution support, an uncapped framerate (consoles will be limited to 30 frames per second), and the ability to adjust the field of view–a blessing for anyone who suffers from FPS motion sickness.

No cross-save between PCs and console

It’s a rare feature anyway, but cross-play and cross-saving won’t be available with Destiny 2, as first reported by USGamer. With Microsoft playing up the Xbox Play Anywhere program and the popularity of Destiny among gamers of all stripes it’s a shame to hear Destiny 2 won’t break out of the usual silos.

Choose your platform carefully. This is a game that is best played with friends, and if all your friends are on Xbox while you’re on PC—well, you need better friends.destiny2big

No PC release date

As of now there isn’t a release date for PCs. The game will hit the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 on September 8. The PC release date, meanwhile, is still not set and won’t be for at least a few more weeks, Bungie told PC Gamer. Bah.

Beta for all

On the plus side, there will be a beta for PC, but we’ll have to wait and see when that will happen. Will the PC beta roll out at the same time as the console beta, for example, or will we be waiting longer for that too? We don’t know yet.

To comment on this article and other PCWorld content, visit our Facebook page or our Twitter feed.

PS4 Slim with Horizon Zero Dawn, Ratchet and Clank, Driveclub, and Three Months PS Plus Membership Now Available in India

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The latest PS4 Slim bundle costs Rs. 28,990
  • It comes with three highly rated games
  • Expect more bundles from Sony India in the months to come

The PS4 Slim has received yet another bundle for India. This time around Rs. 28,990 gets you a PS4 Slim 500GB console, Horizon Zero Dawn, Ratchet and Clank, and Driveclub.

In addition to this, Sony India is also throwing in a three month subscription to PlayStation Plus (PS Plus) – Sony’s online service that allows you to play multiplayer and grants you access to an assortment of games each month.

PS4 Slim with Horizon Zero Dawn, Ratchet and Clank, Driveclub, and Three Months PS Plus Membership Now Available in India

While the likes of Amazon India list the PS4 bundle for a May 31 release date, several offline retailers have confirmed with Gadgets 360 that it is available in stores right now.

Considering that Horizon Zero Dawn retails for Rs. 3,999, Ratchet and Clank is priced at Rs. 2,750 (finally making it officially in India after months of Sony deciding otherwise), and Driveclub at Rs. 1,999, this is a stellar bundle. That is before factoring in the Rs. 1,599 cost of a three month PS Plus subscription.

If you’re looking to get a PS4, this is the bundle to buy. You may want to act soon though. According to multiple sources at retail, this specific bundle will be short supply much like the previous PS4 Slim Horizon Zero Dawn Bundle.

Don’t expect it to be Sony’s last first-party bundle either. With Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, Gran Turismo Sport, and God of War expected this year, we could see more to come from the company.

It’s time for PC game demos to make a comeback

 

I’ve been privately lamenting the lack of PC game demos lately. There was a time when demos were commonplace: a chunk of a brand new game you could try out for free before you bought the full game. Demos gave us a chance not only see what a game had to offer and whether or not we enjoyed it, but also allowed us to continually tweak the settings and try different graphics options to see how our PCs handled it. Plus, instead of waiting months for a sale to try the game without a lot of risk, you could play right when the game came out, while everyone else was still talking about it.

While I was at PDXCon this past weekend I spent a few minutes talking with Kim Nordstrom, former general manager of Swedish game company King and current leader of Paradox Interactive’s mobile initiative. We chatted about PC and mobile games, and especially about Introversion’s Prison Architect, which is making an unlikely appearance on mobile platforms with Paradox as the publisher. Nordstrom’s plan for Prison Architect provide a few lessons PC games could learn from with its unusual, almost shareware-era approach to pricing.

Mobility

Big, meaty mobile games have a challenge when it comes to sales. The roots of mobile are in free games, or exceedingly cheap ones: 99 cents, maybe a couple of dollars. Pricing a mobile game at $15 or $20 is a dubious prospect, which is why so many are free-to-play with microtransactions: get the game into players’ hands first, and try to get money out of them later. The issue is that ‘microtransaction’ has become something of a dirty word, and that’s mostly true on PC as well. While there are a number of great free-to-play games on PC like Dota 2 and League of Legends, there are scores more that have left us highly suspicious of the F2P model, with gated progress and gameplay designed around making you so damn impatient you’ll pay just to advance at a reasonable pace.Image result for It's time for PC game demos to make a comeback

On mobile, Prison Architect will cost around $15. That feels like a fair price for what you get—it’s a complex management simulation and a great gameone of my favorites from 2015—but Nordstrom knows simply plopping it on mobile stores with that price tag probably won’t fly. So it will be free to download, and unlocking the complete game lands somewhere between free-to-play and full-price.

“It’s not a free-to-play with microtransactions, nothing like that, it caps at $15 right now,” Nordstrom told me. “But we basically just made it so anyone can install it, and it’s a try before you buy.”

Nordstrom holds out his hands a few inches apart, then widens them as he describes how the game unlocks more content for those who purchase it in chunks. “And the game size is this big, we offer you this much for free, and then we’re very clear on if you pay whatever dollars, you get the sandbox, if you pay [more] you get the chapters, and if you pay the full price you get the full game.”

So, you get to play a portion of the game as much as you want for free, just like a PC demo. Inside the game itself there’s a store that lets you unlock the rest of the features at certain price points. While that sounds suspiciously like microtransactions, there’s a difference: the total amount you can spend is capped. You won’t be nickel-and-dimed forever. If you decide to spend money, you’ll know exactly how much, in advance, it will cost you, and once you’ve spent it, you’re done. You own everything, and you’re never prompted or even tempted to spend more.

The demo, man

As Tyler concluded recently, big-publisher games can cost a lot on PC, especially when you factor in their many special editions, and that along with having no way to try a game before buying it has kept me away from a lot of games in the past few years. With Steam refunds, you can play a game for two hours before returning it or deciding to keep it but as we pointed out recently with Prey, which had a console demo but irritatingly none on PC, that’s nothing like a proper demo at all. (The reason given by Prey’s co-creative director Raphael Colantonio was “It’s just a resource assignment thing. We couldn’t do a demo on both the console and on the PC, we had to choose.”)

Sometimes there are free weekends for games, which are great, but that’s usually well after launch (this weekend’s Rising Storm 2 beta excepted) and usually long after people are actively talking about the game and your friends are still playing it. I’ve never bought a game just for a pre-order bonus, because pre-purchasing isn’t a great idea and the bonuses aren’t much to speak of (what am I really going to do with a digital art book, besides either flip through it once and forget it, or completely forget to flip through it at all). And pre-orders don’t always include a discount, so there’s rarely any real reason to pre-purchase anything.

We do get a few demos nowadays—though most often they don’t arrive as a game is released, such as Dishonored 2’s demo which came months after launch—but we need more, and more games with something like Prison Architect’s mobile model. If Deus Ex: Mankind Divided had been downloadable for free on day one, with a nice chunk of it playable indefinitely (like Prison Architect’s mobile version), players who were undecided about purchasing it for $60 could have gotten a good long look at what it has to offer. It would have given players like me time to play with a selection of augs and try out different playstyles. And it would’ve provided us with a good chance tweak the settings to see how well the it ran on our PCs, something the two-hour Steam refund window simply doesn’t allow for (and really shouldn’t be used for anyway).

If a potential customer such as myself ultimately decides not to buy the rest, what does the publisher really lose? I know creating game demos means more work, and that it’s not as simple as cutting off a slice of the game and plopping it in a folder. But in addition to demos being beneficial to gamers, developers and publishers can gain valuable information from making free demos available. As Kim Nordstrom told me, there’s value not just in the sales a company makes but in having information about the sales they didn’t make.

“The problem is that we as a company, we would never learn if we [had] a $4.99 price point in a storefront, or even a $14.99, because we wouldn’t know,” Nordstrom said. “We would just know who bought it, [but] we wouldn’t know who didn’t [buy] it.”

Information on who didn’t buy your game is useful. How many people were interested enough to download it but were turned off by something in the opening hours? How many people were willing to pay some, but not all, of the full price? Plus, it could whet the appetite of some customers who would then buy later during a sale instead of simply forgetting about it. This strikes me as a net positive for both developers and players.

Even if people don’t buy Prison Architect on mobile after trying it for free, Nordstrom says, “…they’ll play the game and if they enjoy it they might get interested in the company, or the brand, or Introversion’s games, and such. And they might spread it in terms of [word of mouth], and some people say ‘Holy crap, this is a great game, I’m going to buy it.'”

For publishers and developers, demos put a game in front of more players on launch day, provides them with additional information on how their game is being played and received, and can increase interest in their games even if not everyone who tries them, buys them. They can even get more technical feedback if their game is having problems on launch day. For players, they’re given a chance to sample more new games, to properly try before they buy, and less incentive to abuse Steam’s refund policy or wait months for a sale. PC demos are good for everyone, and it’s time for them to make a comeback.

Tekken 7 PC Performance Review

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Tekken 7 on PC is cheaper than it is on PS4 or Xbox One
  • Its graphical settings are barebones
  • Tekken 7 PC specifications are lenient

Tekken 7 is the first mainline entry in the long-running fighting game franchise to see a release on Windows PCs. With its debut on the PS1 in 1995, developer Bandai Namco has kept the PC gaming community waiting almost 22 years. Has the wait been worth it for PC gamers? We tell you everything you need to know about Tekken 7 on Windows.

Tekken 7 PC price

Unlike most new releases on Steam that have been priced similar to their console counterparts, Bandai Namco seems to have taken a more generous approach. Tekken 7 PC price for Indian gamers is Rs. 989, while the Tekken 7 PC Deluxe Edition costs Rs. 1,608. The latter comes with the base game, a new character called Eliza, and access to the game’s Season Pass that brings a host of cosmetic items. In the US, the game costs $50 for the standard edition and $75 for the deluxe edition. This makes Tekken 7 cheaper in India, especially when compared to Bandai Namco’s previous releases such as Dark Souls 3 and Tales of Berseria that were priced at Rs. 4,299 and Rs. 3,284 respectively.

 Tekken 7 PC Performance Review

Tekken 7 PC minimum system requirements

•CPU: Intel Core Intel Core i3-4160 @ 3.60GHz or equivalent
•GPU: GeForce GTX 660 or 750 Ti, or equivalent
•RAM: 6GB
•OS: Windows 7, Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 (64-bit versions)
•HDD: 60GB free space
•DirectX: Version 11

Tekken 7 PC recommended requirements

•CPU: Intel Core i5-4690 3.5 GHz or equivalent
•GPU: GeForce GTX 1060, or equivalent, or higher
•RAM: 8GB •OS: Windows 7, Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 (64-bit versions)
•HDD: 60GB free space
•DirectX: Version 11

tekken 7 settings pc tekken_7_pc_review

Tekken 7 PC graphics options

It’ll be clear from the above-mentioned specifications that you don’t need the latest and greatest to run Tekken 7 on PC. Nonetheless, the level of customisation on offer isn’t that huge as recent releases such as the excellent Prey. As you can see from our screenshot of Tekken 7’s in-game settings, it seems to have the bare minimum you’d expect from a game on Steam. There’s nothing out of the ordinary and in some cases with just three options of anti-aliasing (off, low, and high); while the lack of support for the 21:9 aspect ratio being down right anaemic.

Tekken 7 PC frame rate and image quality

On our test PC consisting of an Intel core i5 3470 at 3.2GHz, 16GB RAM, 500GB SSD, and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 8GB, obtaining a fluid 60 frames per second at 1920×1080 (1080p) was easily achieved at Ultra settings. Ramping it up to 3840×2160 (4K) we saw a consistent 45 to 47fps with minor dips to the high 30s when special moves were being executed. Be it fur on characters like Panda, or the coat on the game’s central character Jin Kazuma, Tekken 7 looks good enough with very little out of place. Even the stages, ranging from the icy almost desolate Arctic Snowfall to Arena – a vibrant octagonal ring complete with a vociferous audience are graphically superb. However, the level of detail and difference between Tekken 7 PC at 4K and 1080p wasn’t tremendous and we found ourselves reverting to 1080p for a consistent 60fps experience.

One crucial option that’s nestled in the display options and not the graphical settings is motion blur. Switching it off nets you additional frames. Useful if your gaming PC is on the lower side of Tekken 7’s PC requirements.

Tekken 7 PC controller support

We tried Tekken 7 with three different controllers and came back with mixed results. As you’d expect, the Xbox One controller worked fine, as it does with most PC games. Our PS4 controller, however, was not fully recognised. While button presses register, navigating with the use of the directional pad or analogue stick did not work. Surprisingly plugging in a Nacon Revolution Pro PS4 controller worked just fine. But much like most PC games, controls are displayed only for the Xbox One controller. This means you won’t see the familiar set of cross, triangle, circle, and square icons, only A, B, X, and Y. You’d think that with Steam supporting the Dual Shock 4 natively, more game creators would as well, but evidently this is not the case.

tekken 7 rage mode tekken_7_pc_review

Is Tekken 7 worth buying on PC?

Given how cheap the game is in India (starting at around $15), it would seem like a no-brainer purchase if you live in a country where Tekken 7 is more affordable than what it costs in the US (starting from $50). Having said that, there are some strings attached if you decide to get it on PC.

For one, if you’re the sort looking to play it competitively, most of the fighting game community is on the PS4. Granted there’s the Tekken World Tour Mode that has events for the PS4, Xbox One, and PC but given how Street Fighter V and Killer Instinct have fared – it appears that the console version of fighting games tend to outlast their PC equivalent.

If you’re not a pro player, there are some other disadvantages. VR mode is exclusive to the PS4 and Xbox One owners get Tekken 6 free with purchasing Tekken 7. There’s no sort of uniqueness tied to the PC version of the game in terms of content. It doesn’t help matters that Tekken 7 on day one does not have Survival or Battle Modes, two well-received inclusions from previous games.

With threadbare customisation options, a lack of content, and questionable controller support, Tekken 7 PC’s price and performance are the only things it has going for it, making it feel like the best and worst version of the game at the same time. The lower price alone could be enough for many. If you’re a little more discerning though, you might want to give Tekken 7 on PC a miss.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Vanquish PC review – Platinum port

 

There must be many gamers nowadays that associate Sega only with PC strategy games, a fate that would have seemed inconceivable during the heyday of the Mega Drive. It’s not as if most of those strategy games aren’t very good, but they’re as different as it’s possible to be from the arcade style games Sega was originally known for. Vanquish though is like being back in the good old days.

Recently there’s been whispers that Sega may be planning to start making new games in its old style, although we’ve had that false hope before. But they are definitely taking a renewed interest in their back catalogue at the moment, and after Bayonetta this is the second PlatinumGames title in as many months to be ported to the PC. And ported extremely well too.Game review: Vanquish on PC is another Platinum classic

Vanquish was originally released in 2010 on Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, part of a five-game publishing deal with Sega that included MadWorld, Bayonetta, Anarchy Reigns, and DS title Infinite Space. Vanquish is a third person shooter directed by Resident Evil creator Shinji Mikami and shows clear influences from both Resident Evil 4 and the now almost forgotten P.N.03. Vanquish itself is barely any better known amongst most mainstream gamers, but hopefully that will change with this new PC version.

Game review: Vanquish on PC is another Platinum classic

Vanquish’s rather tepid plot involves a resurgent Russia taking over a U.S. space station and microwaving San Francisco. You play the game as DARPA agent Sam Gideon, accompanying a group of marines trying to stop any more cities going the way of the ready meal. Storytelling has never been Platinum’s strong point though, and while everyone’s gruff-voiced seriousness almost seems like parody you quickly realise the plot and characters really are as one-note as they appear.

The real star though is not Sam, but his high-tech suit – which makes him look like a slimline Master Chief. But it does far more than just protect him from stray bullets and make him look cool in screenshots. For a start, there are rockets in the boots and arms which allow you to skid along the floor at high speed, zipping into cover in an instant or passing between the legs of larger enemies to shoot at them from behind.

The rockets are powered by a quickly recharging energy bar, which also powers the suit’s enhanced melee attack and the game’s core gimmick: bullet time. Not, it may seem, a very inspired feature but no game has ever exploited the concept quite like this. The slow motion effect is initiated in one of two ways, the first being automatic if you are severely injured – giving you just enough time to get to cover or deal with whoever’s attacking you.

The second method is manual, but only works when you perform a roll or dodge. Vaunting over the top of a barricade, turning on the effect, and then scoring three headshots before Sam’s feet have even hit the floor is a very special feeling, and has still never been bettered by any other shooter.

Vanquish (PC) - short but sweet
Vanquish (PC) – short but sweet

There is a cover system, but you’re gently discouraged from relying on it, as you can’t use the bullet time effect when simply ducking up and down. The game is actually very good at encouraging you to use the full range of your abilities at all times, with levels and enemies proving almost impossible if you try to play the game as a bog standard shooter.

There’s great variety in the weapons too, from a simple assault rifle and rocket launcher to a lock-on laser and a gun that fires bubbles of energy through obstacles. We were a little disappointed by the lack of bosses though, which is usually Platinum’s forte. Especially as the one in all the trailers turns up multiple times and most other encounters lack a similar gravitas.

But that’s a rare fault in what is an otherwise superbly crafted campaign mode. The real problem is simply that it’s unlikely to last you more than five or six hours. What’s there is perfectly designed, but there’s very little visual variety, and once you get a hang of the mechanics it’s not particularly difficult on normal difficulty.

There’s also very little else to the game. Higher difficultly modes of course, and some unlockable challenge levels, but nothing like the variety of extras in Bayonetta. There’s also no multiplayer.