Here’s When You Can Play the Arms Global Testpunch for the Nintendo Switch

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Arms Global Testpunch demo begins this weekend
  • It is a 1.4GB download for the Nintendo Switch
  • It is only available in one hour timeslots

Much like Splatoon 2’s Global Testfire for the Nintendo Switch, Arms is having its own demo with the Arms Global Testpunch. The full game is out on June 16 and in the run up to that, you check out its multiplayer.

ALSO SEEArms for Nintendo Switch: Everything You Need to Know

Arms Global Testpunch for Nintendo Switch timings

    • May 26 – 5pm PT (May 27 – 5:30am IST)
    • May 27 – 5am, 11am, 5pm PT (May 27 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST, May 28 – 5pm IST)
    • May 28 – 5am, 11am PT (May 28 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST)
    • June 2 – 5pm PT (June 3 – 5:30am IST)
    • June 3 – 5am, 11am, 5pm PT (June 3 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST, June 4 5:30am IST)
    • June 4 – 5am, 11am PT (June 5 – 5:30pm, 11:30pm IST)
 Here's When You Can Play the Arms Global Testpunch for the Nintendo Switch

How long does Arms Global Testpunch session last?

Like Splatoon 2, Nintendo has confirmed that each session will last for an hour a piece. With the game out in a few weeks this is the best way to get a taste of what to expect to make up your mind.

It’s surprising that there will be only twelve hours of playable time in total — a far cry from weekend long play sessions we’ve seen from other publishers like Ubisoft with Rainbow Six Siege and Ghost Recon Wildlands. Perhaps Nintendo isn’t as confident about the Switch’s online capabilities as it would like us to believe? After Splatoon 2’s resoundingly positive demo we don’t think so.

The Arms Global Testpunch is a 1.4GB download and you can get it via the Nintendo eShop.

We discussed Arms on our weekly gaming podcast Transition. You can subscribe to it via Apple Podcasts orRSS or just listen to this episode by hitting the play button below.

Nokia 9 FCC Listing Hints at HMD Global US Expansion Plans

 

Nokia 9, which has previously been spotted with the codename ‘HMD Global TA-1004’ on benchmark websites as well as on a leaked official teaser video, has now made an appearance on the FCC website. The FCC listing is a significant development since this means HMD Global – the custodians of the Nokia mobile phone brand – is looking to launch the Nokia 9 in the US market. The leak does not give away much in the form of specifications and other details, but at least confirms the Nokia Android phone is headed to one of the most important markets for flagship handsets.Nokia 9 FCC Listing Hints at HMD Global US Expansion Plans

According to the FCC listing, the smartphone will support both GSM and WCDMA technologies, and will support NFC as well as Bluetooth 4.2 LE. According a report by Phones Daily, the Nokia 9 will have a 5.3-inch display and support dual-SIM cards. The smartphone will also pack a Snapdragon 835 processor coupled with 4/6GB RAM and 64GB built-in storage, as per the report.

Contrary to the new leak, the Nokia 9 was earlier suggested to sport a bigger 5.5-inch QHD display. Importantly, an 8GB RAM variant of the Nokia 9 has been spotted in benchmark listing. The phone has been tipped to feature dual 13-megapixel cameras at the back with dual-LED flash support as well. At front, a 13-megapixel camera is expected as well. While the battery capacity on the device has not been disclosed, it is expected to support Qualcomm Quick Charge 4.0.

 

Microsoft, Experts Push for Global NGO to Expose Hackers

 

As cyber-attacks sow ever greater chaos worldwide, IT titan Microsoft and independent experts are pushing for a new global NGO tasked with the tricky job of unmasking the hackers behind them.

Dubbed the “Global Cyber Attribution Consortium”, according to a recent report by the Rand Corporation think-tank, the NGO would probe major cyber-attacks and publish, when possible, the identities of their perpetrators, whether they be criminals, global hacker networks or states.

“This is something that we don’t have today: a trusted international organisation for cyber-attribution,” Paul Nicholas, director of Microsoft’s Global Security Strategy, told NATO’s Cycon cyber-security conference in Tallinn last week.

With state and private companies having “skills and technologies scattered around the globe” Nicholas admits it becomes “really difficult when you have certain types of complex international offensives occurring.”

“The main actors look at each other and they sort of know who they think it was, but nobody wants to make an affirmation.”Microsoft, Experts Push for Global NGO to Expose Hackers

Microsoft already floated the idea of an anti-hacking NGO in a June 2016 report that urged the adoption of international standards on cyber-security.

The report by Rand commissioned by Microsoft called “Stateless Attribution – Toward international accountability in Cyberspace” analyses a string of major cyber-attacks.

They include offensives on Ukraine’s electricity grid, the Stuxnet virus that ravaged an Iranian nuclear facility, the theft of tens of millions of confidential files from the US Office of Personnel Management (OPM) or the notorious WannaCry ransomware virus.

Duping investigators
“In the absence of credible institutional mechanisms to contain hazards in cyberspace, there are risks that an incident could threaten international peace and the global economy,” the report’s authors conclude.
They recommend the creation of an NGO bringing together independent experts and computer scientists that specifically excludes state actors, who could be bound by policy or politics to conceal their methods and sources.

Rand experts suggest funding for the consortium could come from international philanthropic organisations, institutions like the United Nations, or major computer or telecommunications firms.

Pinning down the identity of hackers in cyberspace can be next to impossible, according to experts who attended Cycon.

“There are ways to refurbish an attack in a way that 98 percent of the digital traces point to someone else,” Sandro Gaycken, founder and director of the Digital Society Institute at ESMT Berlin, told AFP in Tallinn.

“There is a strong interest from criminals to look like nation-states, a strong interest from nation-states to look like criminals,” he said.

“It’s quite easy to make your attack look like it comes from North Korea.”

According to experts at Cycon, hackers need only include three lines of code in Cyrillic script in a virus in order to make investigators wrongly believe it came from Russian hackers.

Similarly, launching attacks during working hours in China raises suspicions about Chinese involvement.

Hackers can also cover their tracks by copying and pasting bits and pieces of well known Trojan viruses, something that points the finger at their original authors.

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Instagram launches mobile web sharing to pursue global growth

 

Instagram wants to be the photo app for the whole world, even if you can’t or won’t download it. In pursuit of international growth where networks are slow and data is expensive, Instagram has given its mobile website a massive upgrade that adds core features of the main app, including photo sharing and a lightweight version of the Explore tab.

You can now post photos from Instagram’s mobile website

Until now, users could could only browse, Like, follow, search, and see notifications on the stripped-down mobile web site and desktop site. There’s still no posting from the desktop site. But in March Instagram began adding sharing from mobile web, and the Explore tab is rolling out there now. The features missing on mobile web are video uploads, filters, Stories, and Direct Messaging.

Spotted by Matt Navarra, we asked Instagram about the new mobile web features. The company tells TechCrunch, “Instagram.com (accessed from mobile) is a web experience optimized for mobile phones. It’s designed to help people have a fuller experience on Instagram no matter what device or network they are on.”

The mobile web launch ties in with Instagram’s global growth strategy aimed at the 80% of its users outside the US. Other product updates in this vein include web sign-up, a better on-boarding flow for low-end Android users, and the recent addition of offline functionality. These helped Instagram speed through the 700 million monthly user mark. It added its last 100 million in just 4 months after averaging 9 months per 100 million users for several years.

Many users in the developing world may not have a fast enough cellular network to conveniently download Instagram’s app. Their phones don’t always have enough storage to download it without sacrificing other apps or content. And the data cost of downloading the app can be prohibitive.

With the exanded mobile web version, users can skip the app download’s wait time, data costs, and storage needs while still getting the basic functionality. The launch begs the question of whether Instagram will release an Instagram Lite version of its native app, like the data transfer-minimizing Facebook Lite app that has reached 200 million users, and the new Messenger Lite app.

Instagram mobile web now lets you post and check out a lightweight version of the Explore tab

For now, though, mobile web could help Instagram stay a step ahead of its top competitor, Snapchat. Since Snapchat is so video-heavy, and Snap Inc hasn’t prioritized building for lower-monetizing international markets and Android users, its app doesn’t work as well in the developing world. Snap has left the door open for Instagram to become the defacto visual communication app for these countries. Instagram has exploited that with its Snapchat Stories clone, which at 200 million daily actives has more users than Snapchat’s whole app.

Eventually, as mobile networks and cheap Android phones improve, Instagram might be able to squeeze more revenue out of developing markets. And until then, global growth drives the network effect that keeps people locked into Instagram.

As social networks hit saturation in top western markets, they must rethink how to make their apps work better elsewhere. Even if they’re far away and compute differently than we do, these users can’t be ignored.